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Current Mesothelioma News

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Contractor Ignores Stop Order and Clean-up Order, Putting Neighborhood at Risk for Mesothelioma

Imagine spending years of your life hoping that the abandoned building in your neighborhood would disappear, only to find out that when it is demolished, it was done with such negligence that it exposed you and your family to the risk of malignant mesothelioma. That is exactly what has happened in the West Baltimore neighborhood where St. Vincent’s Infant Asylum once stood. The building, originally built between 1860 and 1910, was purchased by a company called 1411 Division Street LLC in 2016, and in 2018 they illegally knocked it down without proper inspections or asbestos remediation. The state of Maryland has sued them for violation of asbestos laws.

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NIH-Funded Study Suggests Yoga Helps Mesothelioma Patients and Caregivers Alike

The emotional and physical challenges of malignant mesothelioma put significant strain on patients and caregivers alike. As is true in so many stressful situations, it is easy for people who truly care about each other to lose patience and snap. Now a National Institute of Health-funded study is suggesting that yoga can not only offer patients a boost in their overall physical function and stamina, but it can also boost mental health for caregivers and patients alike.

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States’ Attorneys General Move to Ban Asbestos

Decades ago, a complete ban of asbestos use in the United States was proposed in response to revelations that the material was the direct cause of malignant mesothelioma, as well as numerous other asbestos-related diseases. The ban was adopted by the EPA but later struck down by the Fifth Circuit, largely in response to objections from asbestos companies and the chemical industry. Today health and safety advocates have continued to wage war against asbestos, and now attorneys general representing 18 states and the District of Columbia are urging Congress to pass a law that would accomplish the same thing proposed years ago.

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New Zealand Family Wins Bittersweet Victory After Loved One’s Mesothelioma Death

A New Zealand family has won a three-year battle for compensation for their loved one’s death from mesothelioma, but the victory is bittersweet. Deanna Trevarthen was just 45 when she died of the rare and deadly form of cancer in 2016, and despite the fact that her illness was caused by contact with the asbestos that covered her father’s coveralls when she was a child, the nation’s no-fault insurance coverage deemed her ineligible for benefits. It took years of struggle to get her the justice that she deserved.

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Ten States Sue EPA In Attempt to Control Asbestos Exposure, Reduce Risk of Mesothelioma

In the face of continuing risk of mesothelioma and other asbestos-related diseases from asbestos that’s in place and asbestos being used in new applications, ten U.S. states and the District of Columbia have filed a lawsuit against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency: the goal of the suit is to force the agency to enact greater restrictions and more robust oversight on the use of the carcinogenic material.

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Study Confirms Disproportionate Impact of Mesothelioma on Navy Veterans

Among the most tragic aspects of malignant mesothelioma, the rare and fatal form of cancer caused by exposure to asbestos, is the remarkably high rate of the disease in America’s military veterans, and particularly those in the Navy. Navy veterans represent approximately one third of those diagnosed with the disease, and the reason for this is assumed to be the more expanded use of asbestos-contaminated equipment in Navy settings. A recent study conducted by researchers at Vanderbilt University has taken a closer look at the incidence of mesothelioma in this population, and their work has made two things clear: one is that Navy veterans are at higher risk for the asbestos-related disease than is true of any other branch of service, and the other is that there are specific jobs held by Navy veterans that put them in even greater jeopardy.

The Vanderbilt mesothelioma study looked at a previously-identified group of veterans known as “atomic veterans.” The group had been exposed to radiation between 1945 and 1962 as part of the nuclear testing conducted in the Pacific Ocean and the Nevada desert. The medical information on this group of 114,000 had already been gathered in several epidemiological studies, and the researchers were able to use these studies to determine the cause of death by all involved. They also used historical records provided by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency to identify the job responsibilities (and asbestos exposure) for each veteran.

What the researchers found was that those who served in the Navy had the greatest risk of being diagnosed with malignant mesothelioma, and that those in the Navy who worked in environments that exposed them to greater concentrations of asbestos had a disproportionately high risk for dying of mesothelioma. Among those working in high asbestos exposure environments (which made up only 20% of jobs), those who served in the Army, Air Force and Marines had no increased risk for mesothelioma, while the Navy vets who worked in those jobs represented 55% of mesothelioma diagnoses.

Exposure to asbestos has caused untold misery in the form of malignant mesothelioma, asbestosis and other terrible diseases. If asbestos has affected your family and you need information on how to fight back, contact us today at 1-800-966-2244.

News

Mesothelioma Victim’s Family Wins Right to Seek Justice from Ford Motor Company

One of the most daunting aspects of considering a mesothelioma lawsuit against those responsible is the sheer size and power of those you will be battling. The companies that used asbestos in their products and those that supplied work environments are some of the most recognizable names in the world, and it can be intimidating for an individual to pursue justice against them. Despite this, the American justice system provides a platform that allows a level playing field, and one where the little guy can often prevail. This was recently seen in a Louisiana court room, where a federal judge told Ford Motor Company that the family of a former mechanic who had died of mesothelioma had the right to file wrongful death claims against them on multiple grounds.

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As Mesothelioma and Ovarian Cancer Lawsuits Are Won, Science Establishes Link Between Talc and Disease

In recent months, people diagnosed with both ovarian cancer and malignant mesothelioma have been filing and winning lawsuits against consumer companies like Johnson & Johnson’s, Colgate-Palmolive, Avon Products and others. The plaintiffs in those cases have accused the companies of negligence and responsibility for their illnesses, asserting that the talc that the companies used in their products was contaminated with asbestos, a carcinogenic material found in close proximity to talc deposits and mines. In defending themselves, the companies have asserted that there is no link between talc and cancer, but now a researcher from the Karmanos Cancer Center in Detroit, Michigan may have identified that link, giving victims additional evidence to support their assertions.

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Latin American Country Leaves U.S. In The Dust With Asbestos Ban

It’s been more than seven years since Colombian journalist Ana Cecilia Nino died of malignant mesothelioma, and an even longer amount of time that advocates have been struggling against the impact of asbestos contamination in their country, but last week the country’s congress put an end to the issue by placing a comprehensive ban on all mining, exporting, production, sale or use of asbestos in the country. The country is only the seventh in the world to have such a stringent ban in place, though internationally there are 60 countries that have banned the carcinogenic material. Despite these progressive steps being taken by other countries, the United States continues to lag behind, placing questionable controls on the asbestos industry and refusing to move forward with a ban that many had hoped would soon be in place.

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